Thursday, March 22, 2007

Global Warming: Green house gases now crosses the threshold limit


Recently Northern India was affected with a freak weather with unprecedented rain & wind. Climate Scientists in India are generally agreeing that Global Warming was the real villain behind this uncanny climate.


Global warming has often been described as one of the most serious environmental problems ever to confront humanity, as this problem is inextricably linked to the process of development and economic growth itself. Since greenhouse gases are generated by burning fossil fuels as in power plants, factories and automobiles, it is not easy to reduce emissions, since virtually every facet of our lives is intimately tied to the consumption of energy. Climate change is an unusually difficult issue for the people who make the decisions in democratic governments. First of all, the science is uncertain while governments have to make firm policy decisions, if only the decision to do nothing, long before these uncertainties can be resolved.


Political leaders are already beginning to overstate the clarity of the science in order to attract public support. A lot of money is now going into climate research, and new findings with varying political implications will continue to appear.


Any serious attempt to cut emissions will have clear and immediate costs, but the benefits may not appear for a long time. To the extent that the benefits may be disasters that didn’t happen, they may never be obvious. But the costs will be. As the debate develops, much of it is being cast in terms of the restraint that the present generation owes to future generations.

Research reveals that the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has now crossed a threshold, set down by scientists from around the world at a conference in Britain last year, beyond which really dangerous climate change is likely to be unstoppable.


The implication is that some of global warming's worst predicted effects, from destruction of ecosystems to increased hunger and water shortages for billions of people, cannot now be avoided, whatever we do. It gives considerable force to the contention by the green guru Professor James Lovelock, put forward last month in The Independent, that climate change is now past the point of no return.


The danger point we are now firmly on course for is a rise in global mean temperatures to 2 degrees above the level before the Industrial Revolution in the late 18th century.


At the moment, global mean temperatures have risen to about 0.6 degrees above the pre-industrial era - and worrying signs of climate change, such as the rapid melting of the Arctic ice in summer, are already increasingly evident. But a rise to 2 degrees would be far more serious.
By that point it is likely that the Greenland ice sheet will already have begun irreversible melting, threatening the world with a sea-level rise of several metres. Agricultural yields will have started to fall, not only in Africa but also in Europe, the US and Russia, putting up to 200 million more people at risk from hunger, and up to 2.8 billion additional people at risk of water shortages for both drinking and irrigation. The Government's conference on Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change, held at the UK Met Office in Exeter a year ago, highlighted a clear threshold in the accumulation of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, which should not be surpassed if the 2 degree point was to be avoided with "relatively high certainty".
This was for the concentration of CO2 and other gases such as methane and nitrous oxide, taken together in their global warming effect, to stay below 400ppm (parts per million) in CO2 terms - or in the jargon, the "equivalent concentration" of CO2 should remain below that level.


The warning was highlighted in the official report of the Exeter conference, published recently.. However, an investigation by The Independent has established that the CO2 equivalent concentration, largely unnoticed by the scientific and political communities, has now risen beyond this threshold.


Research commissioned by The Independent reveals that the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has now crossed a threshold, set down by scientists from around the world at a conference in Britain last year, beyond which really dangerous climate change is likely to be unstoppable.


The implication is that some of global warming's worst predicted effects, from destruction of ecosystems to increased hunger and water shortages for billions of people, cannot now be avoided, whatever we do. It gives considerable force to the contention by the green guru Professor James Lovelock, put forward last month in The Independent, that climate change is now past the point of no return.


The danger point we are now firmly on course for is a rise in global mean temperatures to 2 degrees above the level before the Industrial Revolution in the late 18th century.


At the moment, global mean temperatures have risen to about 0.6 degrees above the pre-industrial era - and worrying signs of climate change, such as the rapid melting of the Arctic ice in summer, are already increasingly evident. But a rise to 2 degrees would be far more serious.
By that point it is likely that the Greenland ice sheet will already have begun irreversible melting, threatening the world with a sea-level rise of several metres. Agricultural yields will have started to fall, not only in Africa but also in Europe, the US and Russia, putting up to 200 million more people at risk from hunger, and up to 2.8 billion additional people at risk of water shortages for both drinking and irrigation. A Government's conference on Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change, held at the UK Met Office in Exeter a year ago, highlighted a clear threshold in the accumulation of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, which should not be surpassed if the 2 degree point was to be avoided with "relatively high certainty".
This was for the concentration of CO2 and other gases such as methane and nitrous oxide, taken together in their global warming effect, to stay below 400ppm (parts per million) in CO2 terms - or in the jargon, the "equivalent concentration" of CO2 should remain below that level.


For India, the climate change issue has several ramifications: First, although India does not currently have any obligations under the Convention to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, international pressure will keep increasing in this regard. It is therefore important for us to develop a clear understanding of our emission inventory. We also need to document and analyse our efforts in areas such as renewable energy, wasteland development and afforestation – all of which contribute towards either reducing CO2 emissions or increasing CO2 removal from the atmosphere. Considering that these efforts may often be undertaken for a variety of reasons not directly related to global warming, but yet have benefits as far as climate change is concerned, we may be able to leverage such efforts in the international context.
Second, we need to develop a clear and well articulated position on each of the three basic questions indicated earlier. This position needs to be supported by appropriate analysis. The Indian research community could contribute substantially in this regard.

Finally, we need to recognise that even if countries do undertake immediate and rapid action to reduce their emissions, some degree of climate change is inevitable. If we consider the fact that we have very limited abilities to deal with weather extremes in the present day, the situation may get worse in the future. Therefore, we need to significantly improve our ability to plan and adapt to extreme events such as floods, droughts, cyclones and other meteorological hazards. Any robustness that we build into the system in this regard will always stand us in good stead, no matter what climate change actually transpires. But a strategic plannining towards renewable energy sources will sources will help us to undertake this challenge of Global Warming. We are the only country in the world with a seperate Ministry for New and Renewable Energy Sources. Let us utilise this highlevel policy making body to make India progress further in this field which will eventualy make us more into safer side.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Depending on their own unique situation, a pursuit "spike"
can also be possible over a prolonged period too
payday loans online he also mentioned a dispute over drilling rights from
cyprus, which can be divided in a greek cypriot south
and a turkish cypriot north.

Jordans Nike said...

Scott Waring described the stone cheap nike jordan shoes anomaly as a “Face on Mars.” NASA had pointed Cheap Nike jordan shoes out the apparent head statue along with other stone anomalies with cheap jordan different color arrows. This helped bring it to Waring’s attention, wholesale jordan shoes for sale who cheap jordans claims that the head was likely part of a larger cheap jordans statue that discount nike jordans was broken apart during some air jordan shoes past cataclysmic event. The clarity of the head and face is wholesale jordan shoes stunning. This makes it difficult to dismiss Waring’s conclusion Cheap jordans that the wholesale jordan shoes photo is powerful evidence of a jordan shoes for cheap past cheap jordan shoes civilization on Mars.

艾丰 said...

jianbin0314
michael kors outlet online
hollister canada
mcm outlet
nike air max
michael kors outlet online
air max 2015
rolex watches
camisetas futbol baratas
michael kors outlet sale
michael kors outlet
giuseppe zanotti outlet
michael kors wallet sale
coach outlet store
abercrombie and fitch
kobe 9
true religion outlet
coach outlet online
nike huarache
basketball shoes
cheap nfl jerseys
louis vuitton handbags
lacoste shirts
ray ban sunglasses
nike outlet store
michael kors canada
nike air max uk
michael kors handbags
true religion jeans
calvin klein outlet
tods outlet
nike roshe run
michael kors outlet online
michael kors outlet
christian louboutin uk
christian louboutin shoes
michael kors outlet

Gege Dai said...

replica watches
swarovski jewelry
rolex orologi
cheap snapbacks
louboutin pas cher
louis vuitton bags cheap
michael kors outlet online
canada goose outlet
replica watches
tory burch outlet online
tiffany jewelry
converse shoes sale
michael kors outlet clearance
mulberry outlet
tory burch outlet
pandora jewelry
tods shoes
nike air max
cartier sunglasses
nike foamposite
michael kors handbags
michael kors handbags
longchamp outlet online
calvin klein outlet
mulberry outlet
nike huarache
ray-ban sunglasses
ray ban sunglasses sale
nike store uk
ray ban sunglasses
ralph lauren femme
cheap ugg boots
ray ban sunglasses
moncler coats
michael kors outlet
louis vuitton outlet store
0808jianxiang

chenlili said...

ugg slippers
ugg boots
jordan femme
cheap oakley sunglasses
uggs outlet
cheap ray ban sunglasses
ray ban sunglasses
michael kors outlet
toms shoes
cheap oakley sunglasses
chenlili20161027

marko said...

The World Wide Web is an immeasurable field loaded with great wellsprings of data on pretty much anything you can need to know anything about. All things considered, even home credit guidance for individuals keen on getting a home advance can be effectively open. check cashing

raybanoutlet001 said...

pandora jewelry
north face
nike tn pas cher
cheap jordan shoes
michael kors outlet
cheap michael kors handbags
nike huarache
michael kors handbags
michael kors handbags
san antonio spurs jerseys

New and Renewable Energy

New and Renewable Energy
Your source for the New and Renewable Energy News and Technologies